Why the PCR Test is unsuitable to identify Covid-19

How it works:


To amplify a segment of DNA using PCR, the sample is first heated so the DNA denatures, or separates into two pieces of single-stranded DNA.


Next, an enzyme called "Taq polymerase" synthesizes - builds - two new strands of DNA, using the original strands as templates.


This process results in the duplication of the original DNA, with each of the new molecules containing one old and one new strand of DNA.


Then each of these strands can be used to create two new copies, and so on, and so on.


The cycle of denaturing and synthesizing new DNA is repeated as many as 30 or 40 times, leading to more than one billion exact copies of the original DNA segment.


The W.H.O. says that any test with a cycle rate above 25 will produce false positives as it will find dead nucleotides from previous illnesses as the bodies own natural immune system combats 'foreign' bacteria. A recent FOI request to hospitals in Scotland showed that they are running PCR Test cycles in excess of 40 and often 45 cycles resulting in 97% false positives.


The inventor of the PCR Test, Dr. Karry Mullen said equivocally that it is not designed to tell if you are ill with a particular disease.

For several months, experts have highlighted the true cause behind the COVID-19 pandemic, namely the incorrect use of PCR tests set at a ridiculously high cycle count (CT), which falsely labels healthy people as “COVID-19 cases.” In reality, the PCR test is not a proper diagnostic test, although it has been promoted as such.


A persistent sticking point with the PCR test is that it picks up dead viral debris, and by excessively magnifying those particles with CTs in the 40s, noninfectious individuals are labeled as infectious and told to self-isolate. In short, media and public health officials have conflated “cases” — positive tests — with the actual illness.


Medically speaking, a “case” refers to a sick person. It never ever referred to someone who had no symptoms of illness. Now all of a sudden, this well-established medical term, “case,” has been arbitrarily redefined to mean someone who tested positive for the presence of noninfectious viral RNA.


The research is unequivocal when it comes to who’s infectious and who’s not. You cannot infect another person unless you carry a live virus, and you typically will not develop symptoms unless your viral load is high enough.


As it pertains to PCR testing, when excessively high CTs are used, even a minute viral load that is too low to cause symptoms can register as positive. And, since the test cannot distinguish between live virus and dead viral debris, you may not even be carrying a live virus at all.



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