What did you do, Daddy?

ANNIE: ‘What did you do during covid, Daddy?’

Dad: ‘I’m not sure what you mean darling.’


Annie: ‘I mean what did you actually do about it? I’ve been reading all about it and I can’t believe it was allowed to go on for so long.’

Dad: ‘Well, people were really worried.’


Annie: ‘What? For years? Didn’t you all realise something was strange, didn’t add up?’

Dad: ‘Well...’


Annie: ‘Did you actually know anyone who died during that time?’

Dad: ‘Not in the family.’


Annie: ‘What about friends or neighbours?’

Dad: ‘Well, no. But I did know someone who said they knew someone who died of it. And a lot of people did say they were very unwell with it. I think I had it myself, but it wasn’t too bad.’


Annie: ‘Didn’t you think it was strange that they were calling it a pandemic all that time and you weren’t seeing anybody die of it?’

‘Didn’t you know that those who were dying were mostly over the age of 80 and already very unwell with other diseases?’

‘Didn’t you know that 99.9% of the healthy under the age of 75 weren’t dying?’

Dad: ‘Well, I don’t think I really knew all that then. The information might have been out there, but they were constantly telling us every day on the television, on the radio and in the papers how bad things were, how we were all in danger, and how we had to be really, really careful.’

‘They had all these experts warning us, as well as the politicians.’


Annie: ‘But in the book I’m reading, it says these experts were telling you different things all the time - that they were constantly being shown to be wrong and changing their stories.’

‘And did you not think it unusual that you were not hearing different views from other experts? When did the world ever agree on something?’

‘And that expert Neil Ferguson, why did the whole world believe him at the start when all his previous predictions on serious health issues had been so wrong?’

‘And what about the politicians? Didn’t they constantly change their stories too, and were caught doing things they were telling the public not to do? Did you trust them? Had they been honest and reliable before all this?’

Dad: ‘Eh...well...no...absolutely not. Wouldn’t have bought a used car off most of them, to be honest. Look Annie, I don’t know where you are going with all this.’


Annie: ‘I’m just trying to figure things out, that’s all. It’s incredible what they are saying in this book.’

‘What about the way they counted covid deaths based simply on someone’s being testing positive for the disease within 28 days of their dying, regardless of any other health issues? That was new; they never did that with anything before.

‘And these PCR tests, was there not always huge doubt over their reliability?’

‘And why did people meekly keep wearing masks when there was no real science given to support them and after being told for months at the start that they were useless?

And why were children made to wear them all day in classrooms? How cruel was that?’

‘Did you wear masks, Dad?’

Dad: ‘Yes, I did. We were told to. Look, I think you are being a bit unreasonable.’


Annie: ‘Really? Why were the elderly and others made to live alone without company for long periods during all this? Didn’t anyone realise that would not be good for their health?’ ‘Why were so many small businesses allowed to be shut for good and so many jobs lost? Didn’t that concern you, the effect that would have on people?’

‘And what about those people who lost their jobs because they wouldn’t take the vaccine, didn’t that bother you? Did you not think it was seriously wrong that many people were being forced into taking something they didn’t want, especially something that did not even stop the disease being spread or them catching it?’

‘Did that not seem weird and illogical to you?’

‘Did you not wonder why so many people, including medical professionals, were prepared to lose their livelihoods rather than take these injections?’

‘Oh and tell me, did you know about all the deaths and dreadful side effects? These medical people obviously did.’

Dad: ‘Well, we did hear about some, but we were told they were extremely rare. That said, I felt okay after my jabs but I did know a lot of people who said they felt awful for a long time. Some said they had never felt right since.’

‘Looking back, I guess there was a lot that we weren’t really being told but most of us just went along with it.’

‘It wasn’t as it seems now, it really wasn’t darling. And I was really busy with my job and other things. I trusted what we were being told. Most of us did.’


Annie: ‘I can’t believe how close I came to being given an awful injection I didn’t need when I was just two years old. Would you have stopped them?’

Dad: ‘Eh....I’m sure you would have been alright. You would have been darling.’


Annie: ‘Dad, I’m 15 years old. I’m sick of you talking to me like I’m a child. For years now you have been nagging at me to be careful, not to be too trusting of people. You’ve told me to question everything, make up my own mind and not just go along with the crowd - haven’t you?’

Dad: ‘Yes, yes, but it’s only because I want what’s best for you Annie darling.’


Annie: ‘You always say that, but did you do what you tell me?’

‘Did you? And you a journalist as well. Were journalists not always supposed to investigate and ask awkward questions and stand up for people?’

‘Why did you not say anything Dad? Why didn’t you? Why?’


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