US CDC officials thought the definition of a vaccine was “problematic,” so they changed it

07/14/2022 / By Belle Carter


Emails from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed that the health agency changed its definition for both “vaccine” and “vaccination.” The move was triggered by officials citing people’s comments that the definitions do not apply to the efficacy of the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) jabs.


The emails were obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request.


CDC official Alycia Downs wrote in an email dated August 25, 2021: “The definition of vaccine we have posted is problematic, and people are using it to claim the COVID-19 vaccine is not a vaccine based on our own definition.”


Since at least 2011, “vaccine” has been defined by the CDC as a product that triggers immunity, whereas “vaccination” was described as an injection preventing a disease.


However, the agency was flooded by email inquiries on the definitions due to the fact that the COVID-19 vaccines have been increasingly ineffective against infection by the virus.


“Our question is how is the CDC and the rest of the world allowed to call the shot a vaccination when it doesn’t even meet your own definition,” one person wrote to the CDC.


Another one wrote: “Is it true that this shot for COVID is not actually a [sic] vaccine per your definition? Does this shot make you immune to the COVID virus? If not, why should I get the shot?


Based on the email thread, Downs and colleagues Allison Michelle Fisher, Cynthia Jorgensen, Valerie Morelli and Andrew (no last name given) worked on changing the definitions.

The changes for “vaccine” and “vaccination” definitions were pushed through on Aug. 31, 2021, and Sept. 1, 2021, respectively.

The new definitions below can also be found on the CDC website:

  • Vaccine: A preparation that is used to stimulate the body’s immune response against diseases. Vaccines are usually administered through needle injections, but some can be administered by mouth or sprayed into the nose

  • Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce protection from a specific disease.

Observers believe that the CDC changed the definitions because of the waning effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines. At the moment, the agency is attempting to downplay the broad difference in the definitions assigned to both vaccine and vaccination.


A CDC spokesperson told the Epoch Times that the “slight changes in the wording” did not alter “the overall definition.” The agency representative added that the previous definition at Immunization Basics | CDC could be interpreted to mean that vaccines were 100 percent effective, which has never been the case for any vaccine, so the current definition is more transparent, and also describes the ways in which vaccines can be administered.


Analysts view the unannounced changes as the CDC’s attempt to hide the fact that COVID-19 vaccines are not 100 percent effective at preventing coronavirus infection.


CDC quietly changed the definition to support Big Pharma’s initial six-shot plan


The said “quiet move” to change the definition of the significant terminologies last year seemed to have been intentionally done in time with President Joe Biden’s announcement of his strategy to combat the COVID-19 delta variant last year.


Biden presented his six-pronged “strategy” to fight the proliferation of the said variant and increase U.S. COVID-19 vaccination rates.


Also, the change came a few weeks after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the rollout of the Pfizer vaccine and just days after CDC Director Rochelle Walensky admitted that the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines is “waning.”


“We are seeing concerning evidence of waning vaccine effectiveness over time and against the Delta variant,” Walensky said during a White House press briefing last year. “Reports from our international colleagues, including Israel, suggest increased risk of severe disease amongst those vaccinated early.”


The said Israeli study reported in August 2021 that the vaccine was “only 16 percent effective against symptomatic infection for those individuals who had two doses of the shot in January 2021.”


The CDC recognized the reported waning effectiveness so they promoted administering the booster shots. According to leaked documents, Pfizer’s initial plan involved a total of six jabs, proving that two shots are really not enough nor effective.


(Related: Worldview Report: Pfizer knew all along its mRNA vaccine can’t protect people from COVID – Brighteon.TV.)


The FDA seemed convinced that Pfizer’s original six-shot plan is the best way to protect the population, so the agency gave emergency use authorization for a second booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines for older and immunocompromised individuals.


Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla, wanting to push his luck, suggested that an annual shot of the COVID-19 vaccine is the best way to go.


“A vaccine that will be taken once a year is way easier to administer and we should have the population be compliant with it. We are working on that,” he said.


Watch the below video that talks about the changes in vaccine and vaccination definitions.

They Changed the Definition of 'Vaccine'!?


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