Brits told work from home three days a week and ban cars on Sundays to beat Putin energy crisis


The measures could cut demand for oil could by 2.7 million barrels per day within the next four months

Georgiana Scott DIGITAL PRODUCER PUBLISHED friday 18 March 2022 - 14:44


https://www.gbnews.uk/news/brits-told-work-from-home-three-days-a-week-and-ban-cars-on-sundays-to-beat-putin-energy-crisis/251212


Brits have been told they should cut speed limits and introduce car-free Sundays to fend off the biggest oil shock seen in decades.


The International Energy Agency (IEA) gave the advice as part of their 10-point plan to curb rocketing fuel prices sparked by Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.


The IEA urged governments globally to reduce their speed limit on motorways by 10km per hour and consider banning cars in their major cities on Sundays.


They argued economies of developed countries comply with the measures, it could cut demand for oil by 2.7 million barrels per day within the next four months.


Speed limits could be slashed on British motorways Ben Birchall


Among their suggestions was to increase working from home to at least three days of the week, cheaper public transport to incentivise uptake and increased car-sharing.

Using high-speed night trains instead of planes, avoiding business air travel and encouraging the uptake of electric and more efficient vehicles were also on the list.

Many countries introduced such measures to curb oil consumption during the 1970s OPEC crisis.


The Dutch government banned private motor vehicles on Sundays for three months in 1973. People started enjoying picnics on empty motorways and got around on foot, by bike and on horseback. Once the ban was lifted, petrol still needed to be rationed.

Brent crude oil price PA Graphics


Since Russia's invasion of Ukraine, the price of Brent crude, the global benchmark for prices, spiralled.


This was propelled by Boris Johnson's announcement that the UK would phase out Russian products by the end of this year and when President Joe Biden said the U.S. would ban imports of Russian energy.


Petrol prices hit another record high on Monday, the average price of a litre of petrol rose to 163.71p and diesel also hit a fresh record of 173.68p.


Dr Fatih Birol, executive director of the IEA, said: “As a result of Russia’s appalling aggression against Ukraine, the world may well be facing its biggest oil supply shock in decades, with huge implications for our economies and societies.


“IEA Member Countries have already stepped in to support the global economy with an initial release of millions of barrels of emergency oil stocks, but we can also take action on demand to avoid the risk of a crippling oil crunch.


“Our 10-Point Plan shows this can be done through measures that have already been tested and proven in multiple countries”.



New gas field found in North Sea raising hopes of solution to UK energy crisis


IOG generated its first gas from its well in Blythe

Xindi Wei DIGITAL PRODUCER PUBLISHED Tuesday 15 March 2022 - 22:54

Last weekend, IOG has generated its “first gas” from its Blythe well near the coast of East Anglia


The independent energy company said gas from the well began flowing into its UK grid on Sunday. The grids are a part of its Saturn Banks project, set up to produce a new production hub in the Southern North Sea.

IOG chair Fiona MacAulay said: “With heightened energy security risks across Europe and the continued urgency of the energy transition, there has never been a more important time to bring new UK gas resources onstream.

"This is especially true of IOG’s gas which has far lower carbon intensity than imports.”

Government urged to support households and cut fossil fuel use as bills soar Gareth Fuller

Production of another field, Nailsworth, is set to start this year, and would generate gas towards the end of 2023.

Jenny Stanning, external relations manager at Offshore Energies UK (OEUK), said: “This new source of gas, from the UK’s own waters, boosts our energy security at time when the Ukraine crisis has reminded us of the urgency and importance of maintaining our own energy supplies.”


Energy bills are set to rise at least 14 times faster than wages this year, new research suggests Government urged to support households and cut fossil fuel use as bills soar Gareth Fuller

Production of another field, Nailsworth, is set to start this year, and would generate gas towards the end of 2023.

Jenny Stanning, external relations manager at Offshore Energies UK (OEUK), said: “This new source of gas, from the UK’s own waters, boosts our energy security at time when the Ukraine crisis has reminded us of the urgency and importance of maintaining our own energy supplies.”


Energy bills are set to rise at least 14 times faster than wages this year, new research suggests Andrew Matthews

It came as a poll suggests more than three quarters of people support investing more in renewables and energy efficiency to cut reliance on imports as bills soar.

A survey of more than 1,000 British adults by Ipsos found nearly nine in 10 people (88%) were concerned about the price of home energy – and seven in 10 thought costs will increase “a lot” in the next six months.

More than four-fifths (83%) were concerned about the UK’s reliance on energy imports, and a similar number (82%) were worried that supplies to Britain could be interrupted, affecting gas and electricity to people’s homes.

The poll conducted last week found more than three quarters (76%) thought the chances energy supplies to the UK could be interrupted – with impacts on British homes – would increase over the next six months.

When it came to reducing the UK’s reliance on energy such as coal, oil and electricity from overseas, people were most supportive of investing in more renewables and improving energy efficiency.

GB News expert warns Nigel Farage British 'energy bills will triple by the end of this year'

Some 77% were in favour of investing more in clean power such as solar, wind and tidal energy, with more than half (54%) strongly supportive.

There was the same level of support for reducing energy use by improving the energy efficiency of homes and businesses, with 47% of those quizzed strongly supporting such a move.

Support for investing more in renewables and reducing demand through energy efficiency held up even if the measures led to an increase in energy bills or taxes, with 73% still supportive of each approach, the poll found.

There were lower levels of support for investing more in nuclear power (53%) and restarting or increasing UK production of fossil fuels such as oil drilling or coal mining (51%), and again only a slight drop in support for both options if it led to an increase in bills or taxes.

Bridget Williams, research director at Ipsos, said: “The current energy crisis and high cost of energy bills, and the Russian invasion of Ukraine and discussions around reliance on Russian oil and gas imports, appear to have brought issues of energy security more top of mind to the British public recently.

“Many are concerned about energy bills now, and how these will change in the future. The public also see increasing chances that events may cause interruptions to energy supplies in the future.

“While many solutions to reduce our future reliance on energy imports will take time to implement, it is encouraging to see strong support for policies which improve the UK’s energy security, even if it leads to short-term pain for households through higher bills and taxes.

It came as a poll suggests more than three quarters of people support investing more in renewables and energy efficiency to cut reliance on imports as bills soar.

A survey of more than 1,000 British adults by Ipsos found nearly nine in 10 people (88%) were concerned about the price of home energy – and seven in 10 thought costs will increase “a lot” in the next six months.

More than four-fifths (83%) were concerned about the UK’s reliance on energy imports, and a similar number (82%) were worried that supplies to Britain could be interrupted, affecting gas and electricity to people’s homes.

The poll conducted last week found more than three quarters (76%) thought the chances energy supplies to the UK could be interrupted – with impacts on British homes – would increase over the next six months.

When it came to reducing the UK’s reliance on energy such as coal, oil and electricity from overseas, people were most supportive of investing in more renewables and improving energy efficiency.


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